CHANGE THE EQUATION.

Close the GenderPayWorkforceAI BiasCareLeadership Gap.

We are an events and media business

ADVANCING
EQUALITY
IN THE
WORKPLACE

HOW WE PARTNER

HOW
WE PARTNER

WE HAVE THE
LARGEST
COMMUNITY
OF WOMEN
IN BUSINESS.

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OUR PARTNERS

The most influential businesses in the world.

We are the Power of the Pack®.

“A WOMAN ALONE HAS POWER; TOGETHER, WE HAVE IMPACT.”

– Shelley Zalis, Founder & CEO

UPCOMING EVENTS

UPCOMING
EVENTS

A sneak peek of some upcoming in-person and digital events.

MEDIA SPOTLIGHT

120M+ people have viewed our most recent viral video. Join the CONVERSATION.

MEDIA SPOTLIGHT

120M+ people have viewed our most recent viral video.

Join the CONVERSATION.

PRESS

Recent highlights from coverage, content and collaborations.

ARE YOU
FEELING
SOCIAL?

@femalequotient
She is glowing! Nurture your inner child 🥹

🎥 @rozysmagicalworld
The hair flip. The back flip. The multitasking. ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

🎥 a.m.parson
Imposter syndrome happens to us all. It’s that feeling of being undeserving of the success that you’ve earned. A phony. A fake.

@issarae is onto something. Maybe every now and then, a small dose of this experience, or a dash of fear, can drive you to even more self improvement. How do you handle bouts of imposter syndrome? Does it propel you into self-improvement?
Nancy Carell made sure to get the shout out she deserved as her husband accepted the award for 2006 Best Actor at the Golden Globes, and we’re here for it 👏

🎥 Steve Carell
Pitting women against each other to create some sort of conversation is just… boring. And outdated. Well done, @pink, for shutting down that narrative and honoring the Queen of Pop who opened the door for so many 👑
An engaged dad + an organic conversation about *very* important decisions 🎀 Ohio dad Frank Aaron Brown’s chat with his daughter gives us all the feels. An expert said he nailed the art of parent-child communication 👏

🎥 @nikkiverabrown
Born in 1910, Margaret Dunning learned to drive at age 8 and happened to live next door to Henry Ford where her love of cars blossomed. Her prized possession? A 1930 Packard Roadster.

She studied for two years at the University of Michigan but was forced to drop out at the height of the Great Depression when her family needed help to keep the family business afloat. During World War II, Margaret volunteered in Plymouth’s Red Cross motor pool, driving a truck.

From 1962 to 1984, Margaret served on the board of Community Federal Credit Union, including 19 years as president. Under her leadership, the Credit Union increased its assets from $1 million to $40 million. She challenged the status quo in male-dominated industries her entire life.

Margaret passed away just before her 105th birthday. She changed her own oil and spark plugs until the very end. “I love the old cars,” she once said. “I love the smell of gasoline. It runs in my veins.” What an incredible life she lead!
Curious what Caitlin Clark, the #1 WNBA draft pick will be making her first season? $76,535. For context, the #1 NBA draft pick in 2023, Victor Wembanyama, earned more than $12 million in his first season. That’s almost twice her salary in a single game.

While it’s very clear that players like Caitlin Clark and Angel Reese have had a positive impact on viewership and ticket sales, a pay gap this stark can’t be solved by one or two players. It’ll take increased exposure, corporate sponsorship, and better broadcast deals to generate excitement and engagement for the league that really pays off.

And as the saying goes, nothing changes if nothing changes. WNBA fans (new and old!): buy the tickets, sport the merch, tune in and support women’s sports. The more lucrative the league, the less excuses they have to justify such a massive pay gap.
A reminder to ignore the naysayers. Keep going!
Reminder: you can be humble *and* extremely proud of yourself.

🎥 @lilly
Think your dream is too astronomical to achieve? That’s the one. Shoot for *that* one.

👉 @the_astro_stud
Fact: exercise can help you live longer. A lesser-known and newer finding from a study from the Journal of the American College of Cardiology: women may require less exercise than men to get the same longevity benefits.

For men, 300 minutes of exercise per week lowered their risk of death by 18%. For women, just 140 minutes of exercise per week lowered their risk of death by 18%. Men typically have more muscle mass, larger hearts, and bigger muscle fibers than women. Women typically have a higher density of capillaries per unit of skeletal muscle compared to men, meaning they’re increasing blood flow sooner with smaller amounts of exercise.

So there you have it: get your (shorter) sweat sessions in this week. 💪

READY
TO
CHANGE
THE
EQUATION?

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