OVERCOMING IMPOSTER SYNDROME AND TAKING A SEAT AT THE TABLE

OVERCOMING IMPOSTER SYNDROME AND TAKING A SEAT AT THE TABLE

Thought leaders in the Girls’ Lounge community share how to overcome self-doubt and fear of failure to have more confidence at work. Watch for real-world advice from Shelley Zalis, CEO, The Female Quotient and Founder, Girls’ Lounge; Meredith Kopit Levien, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, The New York Times; Alicia Hatch, CMO, Deloitte Digital; Julie Green, Chief Experience Officer, Microsoft; Debra Bass, President, Global Marketing Services, Johnson & Johnson and Dyllan McGee, Founder and Executive Producer, MAKERS, and more.

Imposter syndrome is basically the idea that you got to where you are for some reason other than your ability, says Meredith Kopit Levien, Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer, The New York Times.
 “It’s based on fear, fear of not knowing enough or not being good enough,” says Julie Green, Chief Experience Officer, Microsoft. Here are three ways to overcome imposter syndrome and find the confidence you need to succeed.
Just do it. “It’s taking risks along the way even when you don’t think you have it all…close your eyes and just take the leap, and you’ll be amazed at what opens up,” says Lisa Skeete Tatum, co-founder and CEO, Landit.
Be vulnerable. “If I can really focus on, ‘If I have fears, then other people in this room have fears. How can I be vulnerable with my fears?’ Then other people tend to lean into that,” says Green.
Find the right sponsors. “People may try to inflict it on us, but then you need to bring yourself out of it and find other sponsors to lift you up behind your own confidence,” says Debra Bass, President, Global Marketing Services, Johnson & Johnson.