From policy and philanthropy to households and Hollywood, women are breaking ground. Read on for more.

The FQ Equality News 5.31.19

Author: Amelia Corwin

In this week’s equality news update, find out why men should take paternity leave, what Mackenzie Bezos plans to do with her money, how one comic is resetting the standards for modern motherhood and more.

Story time with daddy
Photo by Picsea on Unsplash


The Clintons are headed for Hollywood.
Since the 2016 election, Hillary Clinton has formed a political action committee, published a memoir, and gone on a speaking tour. Now, Hillary and her daughter Chelsea are launching a production company in hopes of influencing culture and society through film and television. They plan to bring stories for and by women to the screen. Much like Barack and Michelle Obama’s production company Higher Ground, the Clintons’ yet-to-be-named company will touch on issues of equality that entertain, educate, connect and inspire us all.

Source: Bloomberg

 

The top 100 equality champions unveiled. Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Ai-jen Poo of the National Domestic Workers’ Alliance, Christine Lagarde, activist Loujain al-Hathloul, and Michelle Obama have all been named among the world’s most influential individuals in gender equality policy this year by Apolitical, a peer-to-peer lending platform for governments. Over 9,000 nominations were sent by thousands of people working in public service and in leading organizations (including the UN, The World Bank, and the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation).

Source: CNBC

 

The rewards of taking paternity leave. If dual-income earners take on a more equal share of household responsibilities, then both men and women can better succeed at work. And, for employers, the benefits of offering more generous, family-friendly policies are many.  To help endorse the message, CEO Ben Congleton and COO Matt Pizzimenti at Olark, a 30-employee provider of live-chat software, took more than three months off­­ with their newborns––and at the same time. What happened? Because Olark’s employees had more work and less direction while their bosses were gone, their teamwork and problem-solving skills improved. On the other side, Congleton and Pizzimenti gained more confidence in their parenting skills, developed empathy for women who have to shoulder the majority of caregiving duties and set healthier boundaries between work and home.

Source: The Wall Street Journal

 

Mackenzie Bezos pledges half her fortune to charity. When the novelist Mackenzie Bezos and Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos finalized their divorce in April, Mackenzie joined a rarified club of high-net-worth women. With $36.5 billion, her individual fortune currently puts her at No. 22 on the list of the world’s richest people, according to Bloomberg’s Billionaire Index. Of the 2,153 billionaires in the world, just 244 are women, based on Forbes’ most recent count last month. Only about a quarter of these women are self-made.  This week, Mackenzie announced that she signed Warren Buffett’s Giving Pledge, which invites the world’s wealthiest individuals to commit more than half of their wealth to philanthropy during their lifetime or in their will (there are now 203 signatories). Mackenzie’s announcement verifies predictions based on research into how women use their influence: studies have long shown that women are more socially-minded and interested in making the greatest impact as compared to men.

Source: Fortune

 

Supporting new moms. For the past nine months, the actress and stand-up comedian Amy Schumer has consistently shared her pregnancy struggles with the world, even taping a special for Netflix. This week, Schumer made her first public appearance at the Comedy Cellar since giving birth earlier this month. Despite the rise of pregnant stand-up, Schumer was shamed by “good moms” for stepping back onto the stage, rather than applauded for her strength. “When a career-driven man goes to work, he is a provider. When a working mom does the same, she is a deserter, abandoning her life’s true purpose,” points out Stephanie Ruhle, NBC News Correspondent and anchor of MSNC Live.

Source: NBC News

 

The FQ Buzz. Companies led by women are good for business—and lead to more satisfied employees, according to research conducted by Berlin Cameron, The Harris Poll, and The Female Quotient. Here’s why.

 

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