This week a surprising reason millennials are holding back from becoming entrepreneurs, why women’s careers may be taking a backseat, and how an e-gamer is helping to level the playing field. Plus, a don’t-miss movie to watch this weekend.

The FQ Equality News 5.3.19

Author: Holly Corbett

In this week’s news roundup, we’re highlighting female game changers and history makers, along with some movie inspiration for the weekend.

children holding gray game controller sitting on white bed
Photo Credit: Samantha Sophia on Unsplash

Success linked to long work hours contributing to the wage gap. The demand by companies for employees to work long hours and have inflexible schedules in order to be successful is contributing to the wage gap. This means dual-income earners tend to see the man increase his working hours, and therefore pay, while the woman more often scales back on hours and therefore pay, once caregiving responsibilities increase. Though women are more educated than ever, the impact is essentially being erased because the nature of work has changed in ways that push couples who have equal career potential to take on unequal roles.

Source: The New York Times

 

Record number of women filling blue-collar jobs. Blue-collar jobs that have been traditionally male-dominated—such as police officers, construction laborers and electricians—are seeing a rise in women. In fact, the share of female truck drivers, electricians, plumbers, and mechanics recently hit the highest level in at least 25 years. The trend is being driven by a number of factors, including companies expanding their recruiting pools and women being drawn to better-paying jobs.

Source: Wall Street Journal

 

Student debt is a stumbling block for young entrepreneurs. As many as 60% of millennials consider themselves to be entrepreneurs, but less than 4% are self-employed. The average millennial college grad has nearly $30,000 in student loans upon graduation, and debt is holding them back from becoming entrepreneurs. Companies can help reverse this trend by treating employees like investments rather than as an expense.

Source: The Harvard Business Review

 

First Muslim woman to wear a hijab in Sports Illustrated. Halima Aden, a Somali-American model who was born in Kenya at the Kakuma Refugee Camp, made history as the first model to wear a hijab and burkini in the Sports Illustrated swimsuit issue.

Source: Sports Illustrated

 

Female player changing the male-dominated culture in e-gaming. Chiquita Evans was the first female player ever drafted for NBA 2K League, the video game version of the professional basketball league. It was a major victory for female gamers, who are barely represented in professional e-sports leagues despite many who are highly skilled.

Source: Fortune

 

Knock Down the House hits Netflix. A record number of women and people of color ran for office in 2018, and this new documentary highlighting the stories of some female candidates made its debut on Netflix this week. The storytelling portrays women’s emotions as a source of power rather than weakness, helping to reshape traditional ideas of leadership. 

Source: The Atlantic

 

The FQ Buzz: From how men can better mentor women to why we’re losing our best leaders to caregiving, don’t miss Shelley Zalis, CEO of The Female Quotient, on this Fox Business segment about advancing women in the workplace.

For more Equality News, check out:

Return on Equality: How Gender-Equal Ads Pay Off

How Brands Can Tap Into the Power of Gen Z

In Her Own Words: How to Know When a Business Event is Worth It